Swiss Artists at BIAN Festival, Montreal

Switzerland is the featured country of the BIAN festival an International Digital Art Biennial in Montreal. This year they will be showcasing the work of talented Swiss artists and collectives.

This third edition of the International Digital Art Biennial of Montreal – BIAN – is focused on the theme of AUTOMATA – Art made by machines for machines. It explores the impact of artificial intelligence in art and culture, with a program of robotic, immersive, virtual reality, augmented reality, sculpture and digital video works.Nine Swiss artists are represented, among nearly a hundred others from around the world. They are presenting their works, showcasing the effervescence and vitality of Swiss digital arts. “Switzerland will be recognized by visitors for its modernism, innovation, creativity, and openness to the world,” said Beat Kaser, Consulate General of Switzerland in Montreal.

The opening reception of BIAN will be held on Friday, June 3, at 6:00pm. It is free and open to the public. Come and join us to discover the Swiss contemporary digital art scene as it will be depicted in a plural and innovative way, at the intersection of the arts, sciences, and new technologies.

Time & Locations

June 3 to July 3, 2016
Exhibition Hours | Tuesday & Wednesdays: 11am – 6pm, Thursdays & Fridays: 11am – 8pm, Saturdays & Sundays: 10am – 5pm
Arsenal Contemporary Art 2020 William Street , Montreal, Quebec H3J 1R8

The Swiss artists and collectives include:

ANWD – A Normal Working Day – with Nadine Fuchs (CH), Marco Delgado (CH), and Zimoun (CH)| presenting Day 2501 | 2016

Swiss Collaborative: A Normal Working Day

A Normal Working Day
Day 2501 | 2016

ANWD: A NORMAL WORKING DAY
By creating immersive installations, the collective A Normal Working Day develops a multidisciplinary approach through the use of different mediums. The two performers’ bodies are the main component in their creations, whether they are physically present and/or reproduced by elements and systems. A huge database is created, containing hundreds of digital characters, which are then used to transform space and objects. Their work offers a wide range of associations and connections to the world around us, with its share of human absurdity, cultures and illusions. A Normal Working Day is a collective project by the two artists Delgado Fuchs and the installation artist Zimoun.

Swiss Artist PE Lang

PE Lang, Moving Objects

PE Lang (Swiss)| presenting Moving Objects 1703-1750, Moving Objects 1415-1702, and Positionning Systems VI
PE Lang is known for creating minimal kinetic artworks that control and put physical forces in action with a captivating elegance. The piece moving objects | n ° 1703 – 1750, is based on sound. Once the tension is released, the sound of crumpled paper lingers for up to a minute. The rings in moving objects | n° 1415 – 1702 are not meant to generate any particular sound, but to create associations of ideas instead. Finally, positioning systems VI, is a machine that adds drops of water onto a special textured surface. Each drop forms into an almost perfect sphere through the surface tension of the water and the hydrophobic surface.

Swiss Artist Zumun

Zimun, 186 prepared dc-motors, cotton balls, cardboard boxes

Zimoun (Swiss)| presenting 186 prepared dc-motors, cotton balls, cardboard boxes 60x60x60cm (Tower)
Using simple and functional components, Zimoun builds architecturally-minded platforms of sound. Exploring mechanical rhythm and flow in prepared systems, his installations incorporate commonplace industrial objects.
In an obsessive display of useful and somehow familiar materials, these works articulate a tension between the orderly patterns of Modernism and the chaotic forces of life. Carrying an emotional depth, the acoustic hum of natural phenomena in Zimoun’s minimalist constructions effortlessly reverberates.

Swiss Artist Truniger

Truniger, Deja Entendu

Lukas Truniger (Swiss)| presenting Déjà Entendu / An Opera Automaton
The installation is based on texts and melodies collected from operas narrating the Faust myth – the epic of human curiosity and its limits. 102 screens and speakers are arranged in repetitive patterns creating an emergent space. The phrases and melodies of the vocalist are reproduced using machine learning software. A new version of Faust is created in fragmented movements of light and sound. It is a game with the boundaries of perception. The point where language loses its meaning and becomes abstract. This reveals the proper poetics – in all its absurdity – of the digital.

Swiss Artist Muzzin

Muzzin, Full Turn

Benjamin Muzzin (Swiss)| presenting Full Turn
Full Turn explores the notion of the third dimension, with the desire to get out of the usual frame of a flat screen. For this, Benjamin Muzzin’s diploma work at the ECAL/University of art and design Lausanne mainly consisted in exploring and experimenting different devices for displaying images, trying to give to animations volume in space. The resulting machine works with the rotation of two screens placed back to back, creating a three-dimensional animated sequence that can be seen at 360 degrees unlike any other type of screens. Due to the persistence of vision, the shapes that appear on the screen turn into moving kinetic light sculptures. Those animated figures seem to float in the air, like one single intangible bright stream evolving through time.

Swiss Artist Rodinone

Rodinone, Turn Back Time

Ugo Rondinone (Swiss)| presenting Let’s Turn Back Time, Let’s Start This Day Again (Collection Arsenal)
Let’s Turn Back Time, Let’s Start This Day Again is an immense aluminum-cast sculpture of a 2000-year-old olive tree from Naples. By casting the tree in aluminum, Rondinone bars the organic from becoming perishable and denies the inevitable passage of time, while simultaneously capturing 1000s of years of growth.
Ugo Rondinone is a multimedia artist known predominantly for his circular aerosol paintings, his video environments, his installations and his sculptures through which he explores themes of imagination, desire and of alienation.

Swiss Artist Marussich

Marussich, Bleu Remix

Yann Marussich (Swiss) with Aether Pilot (QC-CA) | presenting Bleu Remix | Performance on June 3, 7:15pm, at Arsenal Art Contemporain, within the framework of ELEKTRA.
Bleu Remix is the sequel to Bleu Provisoire, created in 2001– a performance in which Yann Marussich let a blue-tinted biological liquid ooze through the layers of his skin, representing the movement of the body’s inner processes. In Bleu Remix, the performer sits on a reclining chair in a transparent glass cage. Once again, Marussich takes us on an intimate journey through his body.

The soundtrack of Bleu Provisoire is remixed for each performance of Bleu Remix by a different local musician, bringing an element of uniqueness to each event.

LSD (Light Sound and Death) with Boris Edelstein (Swiss), Steve Buchanan (US) and Laetitia Doizelle (FR) | presenting Blink | Performance on June 3, 9:30pm, at Arsenal Art Contemporain, within the framework of ELEKTRA.

BIAN

BIAN is under the umbrella of ELEKTRA, taking place June 1 -5. It’s an international digital art festival presenting artists and works that combine art and new technologies. A cultural initiative, ELEKTRA is a trans-disciplinary showcase of local, national, and international creations for Montreal’s community. The ELEKTRA umbrella also includes MIAN, short for Marché International de l’Art Numérique (International Marketplace for Digital Arts – IMDA), which will also take place June 1 – 2.

Mutek

Additional Montreal-based arts events during this time include Mutek, the electronic music festival taking place June 1-5, and the IX Symposium, organized by SAT, a forum for artists of all kinds that showcases immersive and interactive experiences, which takes place May 31 – June 4.

 

Stephanie Jeanjean

Stephanie Jeanjean

Dr. Stéphanie C. Jeanjean is an art historian and curator who received her MA from Bourgogne University, in France, and her PhD from the Graduate Center of CUNY, The City University of New York. Her recent work has addressed the relationship between the viewer and the screen and the institutionalization of video art and the projected image, and more specifically feminist militant video and Art Sociologique (from France in the 1970s), and more recent relational and new media contemporary art. She has spoken on these topics in various conferences in France, USA (CAA, SECAC), UK (Tate Britain), and South Korea (KAIST). She has published in journals (last in Afterall, London, summer 2011) and has curated screening of early French video at The Kitchen (NY, 2012) and Brecht Forum (Brooklyn, 2014). Her most recent publications are the reprint of her essay: “Disobedient Video in the 1970s: Video Production by Women’s Collectives” in Hilary Robinson ed., Feminism-Art-Theory (2015) and “Socio-Ecologico-Critico Intruders in the History of Early French Video” in François Bovier and Adeena Mey eds., Cinema in the Expanded Field (2016). She currently teaches Modern and Contemporary Art History at Pace University and New Jersey City University and is a Gallery Educator at the Guggenheim Museum in New York.
Stephanie Jeanjean

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About Stephanie Jeanjean

Dr. Stéphanie C. Jeanjean is an art historian and curator who received her MA from Bourgogne University, in France, and her PhD from the Graduate Center of CUNY, The City University of New York. Her recent work has addressed the relationship between the viewer and the screen and the institutionalization of video art and the projected image, and more specifically feminist militant video and Art Sociologique (from France in the 1970s), and more recent relational and new media contemporary art. She has spoken on these topics in various conferences in France, USA (CAA, SECAC), UK (Tate Britain), and South Korea (KAIST). She has published in journals (last in Afterall, London, summer 2011) and has curated screening of early French video at The Kitchen (NY, 2012) and Brecht Forum (Brooklyn, 2014). Her most recent publications are the reprint of her essay: “Disobedient Video in the 1970s: Video Production by Women’s Collectives” in Hilary Robinson ed., Feminism-Art-Theory (2015) and “Socio-Ecologico-Critico Intruders in the History of Early French Video” in François Bovier and Adeena Mey eds., Cinema in the Expanded Field (2016). She currently teaches Modern and Contemporary Art History at Pace University and New Jersey City University and is a Gallery Educator at the Guggenheim Museum in New York.
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